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Showing posts from February, 2016

Technology in the Atelier 2 / Kindergarten

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There is an idea coming from the preschools and ateliers of Reggio Emila that technology should bend to children's ideas, rather than the way it usually is, where computers serve pre-made content that dictates to children how it can be used.















Working together with kindergarten and preschool teachers Mary, Mary, Elaine and Lisa, we've been experimenting with new (to us) ways of using technology. Here are some of the things the children have been messing about with.



The Kindergarten class started the year thinking about the IRC bicycle races and the big crowds that came to Richmond to see them. They also have a big interest in animals in the city and in the forested land around Sabot. It seemed natural to try some transformations in the kindergarten, too. We read Brian Wildsmith's book
which is about the curious names of crowds of animals. Next, the children transformed themselves into animals in the same way the rainbow room children did, but this time they made crowds of anim…

Technology in the Atelier / Rainbow room (4-5 years)

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There is an idea coming from the preschools and ateliers of Reggio Emila that technology should bend to children's ideas, rather than the way it usually is, where computers serve pre-made content that dictates to children how it can be used.


 Working together with kindergarten and preschool teachers Mary, Mary, Elaine and Lisa, we've been experimenting with new (to us) ways of using technology. Here are some of the things the children have been messing about with.

In the Rainbow room the four/five year old children have been thinking about the forest and nature, and they have also been coming to the studio to make things to transform themselves into super guys and animals, as they do every year. We combined these two ideas and showed the children how they can transform themselves into an animal on the computer, and then add a habitat, too. I love the way the children laugh as they play around with the pictures on the computer, showing pure delight.

 "Look at me fly! Does a…

Theory-in-use and Saint-Exupery's drawing

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I am reading a new (old) book* and found a couple of nice things in chapter 12- "Learning to See the Boa Constrictor Digesting the Elephant: Preservice Teachers Construct Perspectives of Language, Literacy and Learning through Art" by Marilyn J. Narey.


Narey starts the chapter with a bit about this picture:

― Antoine de Saint-ExupĂ©ryThe Little Prince

Saint-Exupery ends this piece by saying "and thus, I gave up what could have been a brilliant career as a painter."
Narey points out that the adults in this story ignore the "visual traces of critical thinking and problem solving" that the child was revealing. I really loved this little illustration of the way adult assumptions can supersede children's intentions, and shut down not only their creative process, but their learning process as well.





This is something I work to check in myself as I reflect on my daily practices. It seems worthwhile to practice this, and to try to model for other adults, be t…